3 Things You Didn’t Know About Running

3 Things You Didn’t Know About Running

A small study published in December of 2,016 found that 30 minutes of functioning decreased inflammation in the knee joints of runners. In the report, researchers at Brigham Young University carried 15 healthy runners in a laboratory where blood and joint samples were taken before and after running for 30 minutes. The researchers compared the samples taken earlier, when men and women were sedentary.
The researchers hoped to find an increase in molecules that stimulate inflammation, but they did not. Instead, they found that pro-inflammatory markers were reduced. “It was surprising,” says study author Matt Seeley, an associate professor of exercise science at Brigham Young University.
Seeley said the report is a driver and his team plan to do the same study with more people in the near future. “I believe and hope the data show that performance is good for joints,” he adds. “Although the results are limited, they are unexpected and could be important.”
Not everyone is convinced. “There is data on both sides of the fence,” said Brian Feeley, an orthopedic surgeon at the University of California, San Francisco who was not involved in the study. “We know that there are people running all the time without problems and others who have arthritis at a relatively young age.” By now, people at all levels should allow a post-workout recovery time.

Can not wait compared to the original.
Women make up about 57% of career finalists, and data suggest that the number of women behind the scenes is global. But men and women tend to come in different forms, and in some cases, it can mean more injuries to women.
Stephen Messier, Director of J. B. Snow Biomechanics Laboratory at Wake Forest University, trying to understand why women are injured more often than men. So far, it has been found that women tend to have high arches and point more as they work their toes. “We do not know if these differences attribute an increased risk of injury,” says Messier, but his team is trying to find out.
Previous research has shown that adult women are more likely to be heel strike, which, according to some experts, increases the risk of injury due to high impact landings. The way your hips and knees people are aligned naturally can also increase your risk. Women also tend to have less strength in their core and hips, which could affect.
This should not stop women from running, though. Women have more body fat, which is beneficial for energy storage and endurance, and are generally more flexible than men, which can benefit your muscles. Women also seem to be better off walking during races compared to men.
To avoid the heel hit, experts suggest that people are trying to get closer to their community or the softer landing during each step. Messier also launched a lawsuit that puts women on strength-strengthening exercises to see if certain restrictions can help reduce their overall risk of injury.
Can even function in aging to a point
As the popularity of increases in competitiveness, more people are doing later in life. “Previous generations did not,” O’Keefe said. “People were not more than 10 miles per day in the 1960s.”

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